Friday, July 29, 2016

Tyler Cowen

Updated FLG's celebrity sightings because FLG saw him at Dolcezza in Fairfax.

Thursday, July 28, 2016

Really?

This Bloomberg piece references a study published in The Lancet, which says that the costs of inactivity physical inactivity costs the world around $70 billion, of which roughly $30 billion of that cost is in the US.  

Okay, big numbers.  Small compared to overall GDP both globally and in the US, but still nothing to sneeze at, particularly given that the author considers these conservative estimates.   Okay, fine.  But then there's this:

"We need more investment to make physical activity accessible to all,” she said.

Uh, huh?   To be clear, investment means public spending.   FLG isn't against public spending in favor of public health.    The return, in some cases, can be pretty good.   But he finds the idea that accessibility is the issue to be fucking stupid.    Walking, jogging, jumping jacks, push ups -- all free.   Require little to no equipment.    Everybody knows how to do them.

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Quote of the day

Matt Levine:
The mixing of commercial and investment banking seems to have had very little to do with the last crisis, no one can quite explain how it would prevent a new one, and it would be a real pain to break up all the banks. The one thing I will say for it, though, is that the Glass-Steagall hard line between commercial banking (deposits, loans, etc.) and investment banking (trading, etc.) is probably a more sensible line than the Volcker Rule line between market making and proprietary trading. There is every reason in the world to combine customer-facilitation and "proprietary" trading in one entity, but there's no particular conceptual reason why that entity should be a deposit-taking bank. 

Tuesday, July 19, 2016

Glass-Steagall

There's been a lot of fucking dumb and crazy shit this election season, so why don't both parties call for the return of Glass-Steagall?

Thursday, July 7, 2016

 
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