Thursday, November 27, 2014

Quote of the day


The division of labor is the essence of civilization, the underlying source of practically every good thing about the material conditions of the modern world. It is why civilized countries do not have famine any more, why we are surrounded by technological wonders, why things like air travel and mobile phones go from being restricted to millionaires to being ho-hum over a short course of years. Most of the technological ingredients for the Industrial Revolution had been in place not only in Britain but in Spain, France, Italy, etc., for years. But British subjects and American colonists had the opportunity and the inclination to begin a finer and more robust division of labor than did their European counterparts. They were just a little bit more free — and a little bit more determined to be free — and that little bit made an incalculable difference, not only to them, but to the world.

Saturday, November 22, 2014

I Don't Think That Word Means What You Think It Means


GQ's Douchiest College list.

Harvard at 4?  OK.
Princeton 3?  Gotcha.
Duke number 2?   Fine.
Brown topping the list?  Of course.  (Sorry, JTL)

But University of Colorado cracking the top 10?  Bob Jones?   University of Chicago?  University of Phoenix?!   Each have their issues, but douchy?  FLG doesn't think so.

Saturday, November 15, 2014

Politics and the English Language

Peggy Noonan inspired FLG to read "Politics and the English Language" with this passage:
I mentioned last week that the president has taken to filibustering, to long, rambling answers in planned sit-down settings—no questions on the fly walking from here to there, as other presidents have always faced. The press generally allows him to ramble on, rarely fighting back as they did with Nixon. But I have noticed Mr. Obama uses a lot of words as padding. He always has, but now he does it more. There’s a sense of indirection and obfuscation. You can say, “I love you,” or you can say, “You know, feelings will develop, that happens among humans and it’s good it happens, and I have always said, and I said it again just last week, that you are a good friend, I care about you, and it’s fair to say in terms of emotional responses that mine has escalated or increased somewhat, and ‘love’ would not be a wholly inappropriate word to use to describe where I’m coming from.”
When politicians do this they’re trying to mush words up so nothing breaks through. They’re leaving you dazed and trying to make it harder for you to understand what’s truly being said.

Thursday, November 13, 2014

Foreign Service Officer Test

FLG just learned that the State Department offers an online practice version of the Foreign Service Officer Test.   Apparently, the Georgetown School of Foreign Service really does prepare its graduates well (at least for the test):


Wednesday, November 12, 2014

FLG Hadn't Seen This

FLG was reading this piece by George Will about Hillary in 2016 when he came across this:

In October, Clinton was campaigning, with characteristic futility, for Martha Coakley, the losing candidate for Massachusetts governor, when she said:
"Don't let anybody tell you that it's corporations and businesses that create jobs."
Watch her on YouTube. When saying this, she glances down, not at a text but at notes, and proceeds with the hesitancy of someone gathering her thoughts. She is not reading a speechwriter's blunder. When she said those 13 words she actually was thinking.


FLG found the clip.  She clearly read the line and then started second guessing it in real-time.   It reinforces FLG's opinion that Hillary will basically say anything to get elected (although he's not sure this statement is particularly helpful), but also smart and resilient enough to carry on.


Saturday, November 1, 2014

Robot Sex

What robot sex enthusiasts forget is that there's far more to sex than the mechanical act

Regular readers will remember that he welcomes the development of sex robots, as he thinks it will dramatically reduce sex slavery and other horrible sex-related crimes.
 
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