Friday, December 30, 2011

Problem With Memoirs -- The Big Assumption

Flavia:
That's what's wrong, I think, with so many memoirs: they assume that their particulars are, if not universal, at least of universal interest--while not actually being able to capture the truly universal or imagine anything beyond the author's own experience. Maybe that's only due modesty, when the subject is oneself. Maybe fiction is a better place for reflecting on how personal pasts intersect with national ones, or for making claims about the human condition.

FLG'll will just post a previous passage of his verbatim:
Since FLG is an irrepressible egotist, this made him think of his post about the purposes of liberal education. To wit:

First, one particular assumption must be disproven. [...] This assumption is: The experiences that constitute my individual life are representative of the entire human condition
.


Then, FLG argues that the best outcome that comes from disproving the Big Assumption is:

The third outcome is when the failure of the Big Assumption leads to the never-ending search for the universal in the human condition. Oddly enough, the second step in a liberal education is exactly the same as the first. The student examines ideas, feelings, beliefs, and experiences via literature, philosophy, art, and history, which are so foreign to their own life that they can find what is universally present in the human condition. This is the ultimate goal of a liberal education. I believe the difficulty in recognizing this goal is that both the first and second step are superficially the same activities.


BTW, rereading that liberal education post reminds FLG that he wants to consolidate all his theories in one post for easy reference. That and edit out his weird ramblings that in hindsight he agrees with but make him seem like a bit of a kook, which he is but doesn't want to advertise.

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

so, is this the end for object sex? dave.s.

FLG said...

Oh, good God, no. What on Earth would give you that idea?

 
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