Monday, May 30, 2011

On The Lost Finale

Both Jacob T. Levy and Anti-Climacus have tried to forget the Lost finale ever happened.

FLG has gone one step further. He has vowed never to knowingly watch any television show, movie, summer stock, you name it with which J.J. Abrams is affiliated even the slightest.

Again, all the Lost finale had to do was explain that the island existed as a bet between Jacob and the Man in Black regarding human nature. The Man in Black believed that all men were corrupt and evil at the core, Jacob was trying to disprove that. They wouldn't have even had to explain every detail of all the supernatural stuff. Just explain why the island existed and that the people's experiences there matter. End of story.

Anyway, apparently, this isn't the first time J.J. Abrams couldn't close the deal, nor will it be the last. In that way he's a lot like a stripper who is very good at getting clients into the champagne room. A lot of anticipation. No payoff.

So, fool me once, shame on you, but fool me twice...

6 comments:

Hilarius Bookbinder said...

I tend to think the problem is that Darlton knew exactly how they wanted the show to end and ended it that way. But they also got so spiteful towards the viewers who wanted 'answers' that they concocted really, really stupid answers to some of the mysteries on purpose: e.g. the Whispers and the Numbers.

Lost did serve the function of getting me off genre fiction, so there's that, at least.

FLG said...

I'm somewhat sympathetic to the spite contra people who wanted answers to minutiae, which were obviously just plot devices -- MacGuffins, if you want to get fancy about it. But having the focus of the series for multiple years be almost entirely irrelevant to the ending is atrocious. I still get pissed about it to this day.

FLG said...

To expand on the MacGuffin point, if you use numbers to drive interest, but then more or less discard them once the plot is moving in the direction you want it to, then fine. I'm kinda in that camp -- Numbers were MacGuffin, who cares. In later seasons it didn't even really matter. But the larger mystery about what the island was, why it had these powers, and what its purpose was, was never discarded. It's poor storytelling to discard it so blithely. None of it mattered.

Jeff said...

Another mostly forgotten example of Abrams being unable to close the deal: His first TV series, "Felicity," the simple story of a girl at college, ended with a multi-episode neopagan time travel story arc. If he'd end a prime-time college soap-opera that way, it's no surprise that "Lost" would be awash in baloney.

Andrew Stevens said...

Don't even get me started on Alias, the only time I ever let J.J. Abrams break my heart (so much potential if somebody had just given some thought to the overall story line). That's the reason why I quit watching Lost so quickly. I knew where it was going. There just wasn't any way to wrap up the series in a satisfying manner and this was pretty obvious at the end of the first season.

Jacob T. Levy said...

I quit watching Alias early in the final season. I've occasionally been tempted to go back and see how it all turned out... but the Lost finale has probably given me the strength to resist that temptation forever.

 
Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.