Thursday, February 3, 2011

Time Horizons: Neoconservative Versus Israeli Attitudes Toward Egyptian Revolt

The WaPo has an article examining the split between neoconservatives, which as we all know is a code word for Jewish conservatives, and Israeli leaders.

Earlier this week, Israeli Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu likened the situation in Egypt to that of Iran, making the menacing prediction that a post-Mubarak Egypt could join other "repressive regimes of radical Islam." The sentiment has been widespread in the Israeli press - and roundly dismissed by prominent American Jewish neoconservatives, who do not see a takeover of the Egyptian government by the Muslim Brotherhood as inevitable.

Here's a comment by Bill Kristol:
I think it's a mistake for people to hang on to a false, quote, 'stability' with an 82-year-old dictator. There are complicated short-term issues, but at the end of the day, being pro- Israel and being pro-freedom go together.

See that there. Complicated short term issues..but at the end of the day, .i.e. in the long run...better to be pro-freedom. Long time horizons.

To be honest, this is pretty understandable. For a variety of reasons, including geographic proximity and the level of the potential risk vis-a-vis the security of the state, the Israelis are going to be more short-term oriented in something like this. So, FLG isn't saying this is irrational or wrong. Just that one would expect Israelis to be more worried about the proximate issues rather than to put much faith in the long-term fruits of freedom.

3 comments:

Withywindle said...

Assuming freedom is the long-term. But "long-term" might be, revolutions come and go, dictatorship in Egypt is the long-term.

FLG said...

Well, in fairness, there is the added neoconserative teleology with a democratic world as end state.

Withywindle said...

Yah...honestly, the neocons just seem more foolish by the year. Speaking as a quondam fellow traveler.

 
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