Tuesday, May 25, 2010

Last Thing On Lost

Arethusa writes:
C'mon! The ending they used was obviously one of the few viable possibilities way back in Season 2, and clearly intervening seasons did not change things much.

They actually developed the mythology in such a way that it offered much better possibilities. For example, and I don't know how much you know about the show since season 2, but the island had been controlled by a man named Jacob for thousands of years and he had a longstanding bet about human nature with his brother, the smoke monster.

Rather than having a, they all find happiness and overcome their demons in the afterlife before moving on, it could've just been that the island is a place where deeply flawed people are pulled by Jacob to prove his brother wrong about human nature. That one person needed to redeem themselves and Jacob won the bet.

A friend said, but the whole point is that the characters could not cannot overcome these things in life. It had to be in the afterlife. To which FLG replied, if that's your theory than you can go fuck yourself. The special, mystical, magical nature of the island was a central theme. A place that provides an opportunity to redeem yourself, a second chance if you will, was hinted at in the fucking pilot when Locke walked. Tacking on some they're dead stuff didn't make sense, and moreover a perfectly logical and foreshadowed, yet profound solution presented itself.

That's what I think pisses me off most. It's not like wrapping it up should've been hard. Not, I mean tying off every thread of story ever, but answers to the main question -- what is the island? Instead, the island was a MacGuffin that was never discarded. Or discarded far too late.

5 comments:

william randolph brafford said...

The sideways storyline has to be seen in its context as a trick/surprise: as the season opened, it seemed to be an alternate timeline, when it was actually an afterlife. It was a cool trick for the season, but maybe not the way the show would have ended in the best of all possible worlds.

But that being said, the best thing about LOST ending is that I don't have to talk about LOST or think about it anymore. Given the limitations of network television, I think the LOST did a good job of being interesting and entertaining and, occasionally, beautiful. And now I'm moving on.

arethusa said...

You are aware, I hope, of how weird you sound...

By "obvious since Season 2" I meant the references to "An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge" in that season. Locke is seen flipping through the story. (This wasn't long before I stopped watching, early Season 3.) I'm not saying it was always the ending they had in mind and they couldn't keep on throwing crazy stuff at viewers to keep them from noticing the lack of substance - I don't think they ever had an ending in mind until they realized the series was going to end - but I'm saying, if it was being hinted at that early, the series is even stupider than I thought it was.

Oh, and how 'bout a little "Lost" with cats? Saves a lot of time.

FLG said...

Arethusa:

Oh, I know how weird I sound.

Also, thanks for ignoring my friend request. And to think that I went out of my way to be all friendly like.

arethusa said...

Oh, sorry, I didn't realize you'd sent me a friend request...sending you an email to explain.

Jacob T. Levy said...

"it could've just been that the island is a place where deeply flawed people are pulled by Jacob to prove his brother wrong about human nature. That one person needed to redeem themselves and Jacob won the bet... That's what I think pisses me off most. It's not like wrapping it up should've been hard. Not, I mean tying off every thread of story ever, but answers to the main question -- what is the island? Instead, the island was a MacGuffin that was never discarded. "

Yes, yes, yes. Very well-said.

 
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